National

If one wants to know if there will be change in the political landscape of Namibia after the forth-coming elections, the answer is simple:  Under the current ruptures and fragmentations of opposition parties, the ruling party will remain the ruling party.
I can confidently say there was not a single dry eye among members of the Namibian film industry and spoken word poetry subculture last Thursday morning.
One of our greats has passed away.
I had the opportunity to travel to Belfast in Ireland and I was struck by how successful that country has been in facing the "overwhelming and unnameable" legacy of social pain from centuries of humiliation.

BIG was actually too small

A report entitled: Basic Income Grant, Otjivero, Namibia - 10 years later published by the Economics and Social Justice Trust, was recently released. The report highlights the comments of some of the past recipients of the Basic Income Grant (BIG) of N$100 per month which ended in 2009. As I have written before, I do not support cash hand-outs as a sustainable solution to systemic, generational poverty. This report re-confirms my position.
I grew up among the Namibian exile community in the UK. When our family returned to Namibia in the 1990s, I was surrounded by returnees and other veterans of the struggle.
I was a weird kid. I was obsessed with checker-patterned clothing, and for a time I rode a checkered bike, wore checkered Vans, checkered shorts, a checkered shirt and to top it all off, a checkered hat. I loved the television series “Roots” and took to calling myself Kunta Kinte.  I would take a shower while wearing my socks.
It is typical that during election campaigns, politicians promise the moon. Sometimes, with the best intentions, candidates speak of what they wish rather than what they know. 
At the close of June’s G20 summit in Japan, a number of developing countries refused to sign an international declaration on data flows — the so-called ‘Osaka Track.’  Part of the reason why countries such as India, Indonesia and South Africa boycotted the declaration was because they had no opportunity to put their own interests about data into the document.
Recent movements in Namibia to make obtaining a divorce easier are a double-edged sword.  Those pushing ‘fast food’ divorces are well-intentioned. 
Recent movements in Namibia to make obtaining a divorce easier are a double-edged sword.  Those pushing ‘fast food’ divorces are well-intentioned.  However, my antennae always go up when people praise only one side of a story. 
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WINDHOEK OBSERVER

The Windhoek Observer is an English-language weekly newspaper, published in Namibia by Paragon Investment Holding. It is the country's oldest and largest circulating weekly.

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