Google removes ‘view image’ button

Google is making a change to image search today that sounds small but will have a big impact: it’s removing the “view image” button that appeared when you clicked on a picture, which allowed you to open the image alone. The button was extremely useful for users, since when you’re searching for a picture, there’s a very good chance that you want to take it and use it for something. Now, you’ll have to take additional steps to save an image.

The change is essentially meant to frustrate users. Google has long been under fire from photographers and publishers who felt that image search allowed people to steal their pictures, and the removal of the view image button is one of many changes being made in response. 

Fortunately, there’s still at least one way around it: if you right click, you can select “open image in new tab” or “view image” (or whatever your browser’s equivalent option is), and you’ll still open up the full-size picture. It’s just a bit less likely that everyone will realize this is an option. And since the “visit” site button is now the most visible button, that’s probably what’ll end up getting clicked the most.

Google has now introduced a 'Question & answers' section to its Maps service on Android, apart from mobile search. As you might have guessed from the name, the new section essentially allows users to get answers to their queries regarding a specific location on the map. Users can ask and get answers to their questions with the new section and business owners can also interact directly with people as well.

the search giant says that "When deciding where to go and what to do, we often ask ourselves lots of questions before making a decision. Soon, you'll be able to ask those questions, get the answers you need, and even answer other people’s questions about places on Google Maps for Android and mobile Search." 

Alphabet Inc’s Google will implement more measures to identify and remove terrorist or violent extremist content on its video sharing platform YouTube, Kent Walker, Google's general counsel said in a blog post on Sunday.

"While we and others have worked for years to identify and remove content that violates our policies, the uncomfortable truth is that we, as an industry, must acknowledge that more needs to be done. Now," Walker wrote.

Google plans to increase its use of technology that identifies extremist and terrorism-related videos, and is increasing the number of independent experts participating in YouTube's Trusted Flagger program.

The company also announced it's taking a "tougher stance" on videos that don't clearly violate their policies, and will make it more difficult for users to find videos containing "inflammatory religious or supremacist content."

In its final step, YouTube is working with Jigsaw to implement the "Redirect Method" across Europe, which redirects potential Islamic State recruits toward anti-terrorist videos in an effort to sway them not to join the terrorist group.

Google already has thousands of people worldwide who "review and counter abuse" on its platforms, and engineers have developed technology to prevent re-uploads of known terrorist content. The platform has also invested in systems that flag new videos that should be removed, and developed partnerships with various stakeholders, including expert groups and counter-extremism agencies, to "inform and strengthen our efforts."

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